Friday, 28 October 2016

One line reviews by people who clearly hadn't read the books - Part III

This is the third Part in a series we are doing of one-line reviews of Books - where the reviewer has clearly not actually read the Book itself. This is, let it be noted, an exercise in humour, and no author sentiments, cats, or country musicians are intended to be harmed.

The first Part of this series, along with a detailed introductory note, can be found here:


All entries are by me except where indicated.



21. Adam Bede is George Eliot’s very colonial look at the Catholic Church’s attempts to infiltrate the beedi-manufacturing industry in pre-independence India.



22. Behind the Beautiful Forevers by Katherine Boo is an excellent essay on fairness creams. [Ravi Kumar]



23. In A Tale of Two Cities, Charles Dickens captures, in eloquent prose, each and every nail-biting moment of IPL Season 8, Match 32, Mumbai Indians vs Kolkata Knight Riders [Ravi Kumar]



24. Midnight’s Children is Salman Rushdie’s startling biography of a night-shift nurse working in the neo-natal ward. [Aindrila Roy]


25. The God of Small Things by Arundhati Roy is a religious discourse on the topology of Gods based on their sizes [Anirban Nanda]


26. Oliver Twist is Charles Dickens’ biography of the erstwhile choreographer whose twisted leg brought a tragic end to his career. [Aindrila Roy]


27. Fury by Salman Rushdie sees The Incredible Hulk making his first appearance in literary fiction. [Ravi Kumar]


28. The Silence of the Lambs by Thomas Harris is an instructional book about teaching your lamb how to meditate for world peace [Archana Sarat]


29. The Fault in our Stars is a treatise by John Green on the life of Galileo Galilei, and how he challenged the geocentric view of the solar system, leading to his being persecuted and tried by the Church [Rahul Rao]

30. Kim by Rudyard Kipling is an ominous future-fic predicting the fate of North Korea.

For entries from 31-40 in this series, click here.



1 comment:

  1. Excellent, and to the point. I wish someone offers similar reviews to our best-sellers, starting with Chetan Bhagat!

    ReplyDelete